Beyond The Basics Fire Training

Blog / News / Work

New Available Classes !!!! - Schedule Them Now

New Available Classes !!!!  - Schedule Them Now
We are booking Summer and Fall classes NOW. Be sure to get the dates and classes that you want.
Continue reading
  91 Hits
  0 Comments
91 Hits
0 Comments

THROW BACK THURSDAY: The Top 5 Truck Tools | FireFighterToolBox

https://www2.firefightertoolbox.com/top-5-truck-tools/
THROW BACK THURSDAY: The Top 5 Truck Tools | FireFighterToolBox
When operating at a structure fire, there are several tasks that must be accomplished to make the building behave. The truck company is responsible for the following priority tasks: forcible entry, search, ventilation, and fire containment. Some of these tasks are typically performed prior to the first line being placed into service, although the truck company must work in coordination with the engine company. Each of these tasks can be associated with one or more of the top 5 truck tools. The Irons (Halligan and Ax) The “irons” — consisting of a Halligan married up with a flathead ax — will make short work of entry doors when gaining access to a structure. The Halligan and ax are used to shock the door from top to bottom, looking for secured locks on the door. The Halligan is so versatile that both the adze and the fork end can be used to open either inward or outward swinging doors. It is up to the forcible entry team to decide what will work best for that particular situation. The flat head ax is the driving force of the team. Team members coordinate when the ax will strike and drive the Halligan to create the best leverage prior to forcing through the locks and gaining entry for the search and suppression teams. The ax and Halligan are also great tools to use when performing a primary search. The Thermal Imaging Camera The Thermal Imaging Camera or TIC has made its way into being one of the most important tools within the fire service. The TIC’s ability to look through smoke, detect and differentiate heat sources as well as locate victims is invaluable. Search teams using TICs have to remember the basics as well. Have a search plan prior to entering the structure and remain oriented at all times. Remember, the TIC is a machine and can fail to operate properly. This is why it is so important to remain oriented when performing searches. The Hook The 6’ pike pole or “hook” has many jobs on the fire ground during the initial moments. The 6’ hook can be used for horizontal ventilation in coordination with the suppression team making an attack to remove the super-heated gasses and steam from the fire compartment. The hook can be used to access fire escape ladders or stairs so members can perform Vent, Enter, Isolate, and Search (VEIS) off the fire escape. Another great task the hook can accomplish is removing ceiling tiles as the search team makes entry into a structure to ensure that fire is not running the plenum space overhead — which could lead to fire dropping down behind them. The hook is a simple tool but it is a game changer in the hands of a skilled firefighter. The Can The Air Pressurized Water Extinguisher or “can” has been an underestimated tool on the fire ground. The can has the ability to knock down a large amount of fire in a compartment and keep it in check until the hose line is in place and operating to extinguish the fire. The key is proper placement of the water and being judicious with the amount of water that is applied to the compartment fire. These skills are not formed overnight. It takes a lot of knowledge and practice to be able to keep a compartment fire in check with the can. Having a knowledge of building construction, an understanding of fire behavior and a good sense of situational awareness are the keys to knowing when to use this tactic safely on the fireground. Remember tools are just tools until they are placed in the hands of a skilled and knowledgeable firefighter. Constant training on each and every tool we use is a must to remain proficient and skilled operators. Keep on training and stay safe! Photos courtesy of John Hayowyk, Jr.
Continue reading
  128 Hits
  0 Comments
128 Hits
0 Comments

Managing Everyday Incidents Class

Managing Everyday Incidents Class
Contact us for information on this class for your department.
Continue reading
  162 Hits
  0 Comments
162 Hits
0 Comments

Making Your Halligan More Effective | FireFighterToolBox

https://www2.firefightertoolbox.com/making-halligan-smarter/
Making Your Halligan More Effective | FireFighterToolBox
The halligan is one of the most utilized pieces of equipment in the fire service. Since its creation, the halligan has shown itself to be the go to tool.
Continue reading
  163 Hits
  0 Comments
163 Hits
0 Comments

A Plan for the Plan | Firehouse

https://www.firehouse.com/leadership/incident-command/article/21165135/a-plan-for-the-plan
jan_21_incident_command_wood_pic_4.5fc957b473155 Have a Plan for the Plan

Battalion Chief John Hayowyk, Jr., explains why it is ideal to break down an incident action plan into segments.

Continue reading
  181 Hits
  0 Comments
181 Hits
0 Comments

First Due: Fires and Other Emergencies Caused by Home-Heating Equipment | Firehouse

https://www.firehouse.com/community-risk/article/21112932/first-due-fires-and-other-emergencies-caused-by-homeheating-equipment
First Due: Fires and Other Emergencies Caused by Home-Heating Equipment | Firehouse
Capt. John A. Hayowyk Jr. urges preparation for the variety of calls that will come that originate from home-heating equipment.
Continue reading
  168 Hits
  0 Comments
168 Hits
0 Comments

Not Just a Picture: The Round Table Discussion - Fire Engineering

https://www.fireengineering.com/leadership/not-just-a-picture-the-round-table-discussion/#gref
Not Just a Picture: The Round Table Discussion - Fire Engineering
One effective way to spend valuable training time is having firefighters read, review, and analyze fire service magazine articles, photos, and videos. The officer can have them focus on a specific fire scene item: scene size-up, life hazards, building construction, and so forth. Each member will see something different, based on his experience, that will add to the discussion. The rookie may even surprise some of the senior members. 
Continue reading
  183 Hits
  0 Comments
183 Hits
0 Comments

Managing Everyday Incidents

Managing Everyday Incidents
This is our new class we are rolling out.
Contact us for an in-person or virtual class on these types of incidents.
Continue reading
  198 Hits
  0 Comments
198 Hits
0 Comments

FD Thru-The-Lock Tool Bag - Tool List

Quantity / Description

1 18" Zipper Tool Bag----Husky---Home Depot
2 6-in-one Screwdrivers
1 6-piece screwdriver set
1 3lb. Sledgehammer
1 6" long Needle Nose Pliers
1 8" Slip Joint Pliers with one handle modified for the Key Tool: Use less expensive pliers only*
1 4" Vice Grip type pliers with Eye Hook Modification
1 8" Vice Grip type pliers with Eye Hook Modification
1 12" Wonder Bar
1 7.5" pry bar
1 14 - in- 1 Spackle Knife
1 Modified J Tool---use long handle paint roller
1 Safety Glasses
1 18" Pipe Wrench
1 3' long Continuous Loop of Webbing w/ Non-locking Carabiner - Used with Vice Grip Pliers for cutting locks/chain.
1 S&D Rex Bar
1 Bag of 14" Heavy Duty Zip Ties
1 KNIPEX Model 71 12 200 Comfort Grip High Leverage Bolt Cutters w/ Opening Lock and Spring.
1 K-Tool
1 6’ piece of FLAT (not tubular) piece of Webbing

* Modify one handle of the Slip Joint pliers by bending inward the end of the handle and grind to a dull point to use as a key tool.
Continue reading
  1812 Hits
  0 Comments
1812 Hits
0 Comments

HALLIGAN MODIFICATION: GAPPING THE FORKS

HALLIGAN MODIFICATION: GAPPING THE FORKS

PURPOSE: Thru-the-Lock Forcible Entry for Doorknob Removal of Residential & Commercial Buildings

PROCEDURE: Slowly grind the fork end to create a 1 ¼” wide by 1 ¼” deep gap between the forks w/ bench grinder (Easiest)

DISCLAIMER: (Get Permission to Modify the Halligan FIRST) / Wear Proper PPE while using a Grinder

TIPS: Wire Brush the sharp edges when complete & lightly oil the fork end of the Halligan

STAY SAFE
Continue reading
  2667 Hits
  0 Comments
2667 Hits
0 Comments

Spring Clamp

Continue reading
  3036 Hits
  0 Comments
3036 Hits
0 Comments

Non-Contact Volt Tester

Continue reading
  3016 Hits
  0 Comments
3016 Hits
0 Comments

Quick & Easy PVC Rotary Prop

Quick & Easy PVC Rotary Prop
Don't have wood or metal to cut; there is always somewhere to DRAW!
This prop will assist in teaching different cut techniques w/o the mess and noise.
Continue reading
  2791 Hits
  0 Comments
2791 Hits
0 Comments

Halligan Modifications: Gapping the Forks

 

 One of the simplest and most advantageous modifications to a Halligan Bar is to GAP the forks.

Gapping the forks of the halligan makes a conventional forcible entry tool into a THRU-THE-LOCK tool.

 

Thru-the-Knob Technique:

This technique is based on using leverage to force the knob off from the knob assembly.

This is accomplished by taking the gapped fork end of the halligan and sliding it behind the door knob. The space behind the halligan and the door is taken up by another tool. There are several different tools that can be used to take up that space. Most likely, the flat head axe is available since it's usually married to the halligan as a set of irons. But, another halligan or pike pole can be used if available.

The upper shaft of the halligan bar is then pushed towards the door with force, and that will displace the door knob from the rest of the door knob assembly.

Once the knob is off, look where the keyway was and see what type of tool you will need to manipulate the spindle which will operate the deadlatch or latch assembly to unlock the door. For most residential door knobs, you will need a needle nose pliers to turn the spindle 90 degrees to unlock the door. Once the door is unlocked turn the stem with your gloved hand to engage the deadlatch to open the door.

For commercial knobs, you will need a screwdriver to turn the cylinder to activate the latch assembly. While the latch assembly is engaged, push / pull the door open. Be sure that the door does not lock behind you, physically unlock the door from the inside knob.

Physically Gapping the Fork:

Gapping the fork is a relatively easy process. This can be accomplished by either using a bench grinder or a standard handheld angle grinder. (Obviously use safety glasses and gloves when using a grinder.) Prior to doing any grinding mark out the area on the inside of the forks where the grinding is to occur. Mark the area on the halligan with a pencil or marker that's approximately an inch and 1/8 wide by an inch and 1/8 deep. This will give you plenty of room for the fork end of the halligan to slide behind the door knob of either a residential or commercial door knob.

The key is to slowly grind away the marked area, being careful not to overheat the forks of the halligan. Once the area has been ground away; use a wire wheel to remove any sharp edges or burrs.

One last note, if the halligan is not personally YOURS, be sure to get permission to make the modification before you do it.

STAY SAFE

Author: John Hayowyk Jr.

Date: May 3, 2018

 

Continue reading
  3844 Hits
  0 Comments
3844 Hits
0 Comments

Alarm System Info

Alarm System Info
Continue reading
  2532 Hits
  0 Comments
2532 Hits
0 Comments

Safety Saturday

Safety Saturday
What are your concerns with combustible storage? What tactics would you use to handle an exterior fire at this facility?
Continue reading
  2325 Hits
  0 Comments
2325 Hits
0 Comments

Happy New Year

Happy New Year
As we welcome in the New Year we see new leaders & members enter into the emergency services field. Our wish & hope is for a safe New Year to all.
Continue reading
  2612 Hits
  0 Comments
2612 Hits
0 Comments

Firefighter Safety

Firefighter Safety
What are you concerns with this door and maybe what's behind it?
When your in buildings it is important to watch out for things that are out of the ordinary that may cause issues for us during a fire.
Continue reading
  2615 Hits
  0 Comments
2615 Hits
0 Comments

District Familiarization & Pre-Planning

District Familiarization & Pre-Planning
Q-Decking & Metal Bar-joist Trusses are not just found in commercial buildings. This residential structure has truss construction with metal Q-decking that is usually found on the roof of Type 2 Non & Limited Combustible Constructed Building. This is the floor to a residential garage which is part of a house that is being constructed. There are hidden dangers lurking. It is important to know your response areas. If this was not discovered during construction only the contractor and homeowner would know of the metal bar joist trusses that exist.
- Keep Your Eyes Open & Stay Safe -
Continue reading
  2806 Hits
  0 Comments
2806 Hits
0 Comments

Planning Your Winter Training Schedule - Check Out Our Alarm Systems Class

Planning Your Winter Training Schedule -  Check Out Our Alarm Systems Class
Continue reading
  2480 Hits
  0 Comments
2480 Hits
0 Comments
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
insta-img
Go to top